But are we really so much more stressed than before in the age of digitization and other technological advances?

But are we really so much more stressed than before in the age of digitization and other technological advances?

But are we really so much more stressed than before in the age of digitization and other technological advances?

Technostress and its consequences

Experts have long warned against excessive demands due to information overload and digitization. The German scientist Christian Maier from Otto Friedrich University in Bamberg has dealt intensively with the subject of technostress. In its

dissertation

he comes to the conclusion that the use of IT can lead to stress, in the world of work as well as in private life.

Social networks and messengers such as WhatsApp, Facebook and Co. can quickly overwhelm users with the flood of information. The pressure to constantly interact socially can be stressful. In a study for his dissertation, he denied 130 users access to Facebook for two weeks. Before and during the study, the participants completed questionnaires about their state of mind and usage behavior. And physical stress indicators such as sweating were monitored using the skin conductance. For the private sector, the scientist came to the conclusion that technostress can arise on the one hand through overuse and on the other hand through the withdrawal of Facebook.

According to Maier, technostress manifests itself in the work environment through an increase in burnout illnesses. If something changes in a company when using IT, this can lead to stress and illness. Especially when there is a lack of understanding of how to operate the new IT.

2018 delivered a German

Study by the University of Augsburg

under the direction of industrial engineer Henner Gimpel, a similar result: Excessive digital stress reduces work performance and can have health consequences. The workers then often suffer from back pain, headaches and general fatigue. The flood of digital technologies and a lack of skills in dealing with IT are also cited as stress triggers.

What eye surgery has to do with it

However, it does not always have to result in digitization as a stress factor. The eye surgeon Mithu Storoni takes a slightly different approach. In 2017 she published her book «Stress Proof» («Stress-resistant»). «Stress does not start in the body, it starts in the brain», is her finding from the countless scientific publications that she researched for her book. In one

Essay for the broadcaster «BBC»

the author explained why stress and anxiety play an increasingly important role today:

Modern eye surgeons sometimes suffer from what is known as central serous retinopathy. Fluid accumulates under the retina and the resulting swellings can lead to impaired vision. This phenomenon is often triggered by stress. Military personnel already suffered from it in World War II. If the stress is reduced, the symptoms decrease. The surgeons have come to the conclusion that the new surgical technologies have meanwhile broken the physical limits of a surgeon. The focus is no longer on the physical performance of the hands, but on the mental performance of analysis and concentration. Constantly working to the limit creates enormous emotional pressure — stress.

According to recent studies, chronic stress is suspected to play a role in high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, as the author writes. For Mithu Storoni, social status and urbanization are two other stress factors. Social interactions and maintaining status can cause brooding and mental stress. Urban life with its constant sources of light also has little calming effect on our brain, especially not the infamous

blue light.

It is supposed to suppress the secretion of the sleep hormone melatonin. And according to Storoni, even ready meals have an impact on our stress behavior. Studies would link highly processed foods to symptoms of depression. Our eating habits would change the microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, and those microorganisms would in turn — through interaction with immune cells and in other ways — affect how our brains respond to stress.

The author comes to the conclusion that psychological pressure is a limiting factor in an age in which physical stress is increasingly being transformed into a mental one.

Read news for free for 1 month now! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

NEWS FROM THE NETWORK

Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at)

New access (yachtrevue.at)

8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at)

Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto.at)

In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

»

Is our life really more stressful than it used to be? Yes, say some experts. And they explain what is causing us so much stress these days.

Stress is essential for survival. If an opponent attacks us, stress hormones are released. The pulse accelerates, the blood pressure rises, for a short time the body is in an alarm state, it is more efficient. Once the stressful situation is over, the body switches back to normal and recovers. Without this relaxation, however, stress can become chronic and harm us.

Fits to:

10 tips on how to get rid of stress easily

Young and already exhausted

A stress study by the insurance company Allianz in 2017 showed that 39 percent of all Austrians feel significantly impaired by stress at work, 25 percent by stress in their free time. It is also interesting: It is not mainly older people who complain about too much stress, but the young: That

Market research institute «Market»

asked in 2018 how severely stressed Austrians feel. 58 percent stated that they felt moderately to severely stressed, including above all the age categories of 16 to 49 year olds and the group of employed people (compared to the non-employed).

STRESS STRESS

Infogram

Job stress factor

According to the Chamber of Labor (AK), the following factors play an important role in occupational stress: a high amount of work and too little time, unclear information and work interruptions. Professional recognition and social support (e.g. from colleagues) are also important. In 2012, the AK commissioned a study from the Austrian Institute for Economic Research (WIFO) and Danube University Krems, which put the cost of mental illness in 2009 at 3.3 billion euros.

As the causes of the stress on mental health, the topics of the workplace, financial worries and relationship problems are at the top, as the market study found. In addition, the survey showed that the negative effect of the «factors surveyed is generally assessed to be more pronounced in 2018 than it was in 2016.» The stress factors «high time pressure» and «constant availability (telephone, internet, social media)» have developed in particular since 2016. In 2018, 82 percent (2016: 69 percent) saw the time pressure and 67 percent (2016: 53 percent) the constant availability as strong stress factors.

At least it feels like the stress level in our society is increasing. Employee representatives in Austria take this into account.

The Austrian Federation of Trade Unions (ÖGB) has been demanding an additional week of vacation for a long time, a total of 6 weeks per year. The vacation entitlement has not been increased since 1986. The ÖGB is currently advocating a reduction in working hours. This is necessary for employment, health and socio-political reasons, it says on the homepage. Employees have to be available digitally at all times, which also limits their free time. The economy is defending itself: The «required reduction in working hours does not solve the challenges posed by digitization, but only weakens the business location and thus also social security in Austria», says Rolf Gleißner, labor market expert at the Chamber of Commerce (WKÖ).

But are we really so much more stressed than before in the age of digitization and other technological advances?

Technostress and its consequences

Experts have long warned against excessive demands due to information overload and digitization. The German scientist Christian Maier from Otto Friedrich University in Bamberg has dealt intensively with the subject of technostress. In its

dissertation

he comes to the conclusion that the use of IT can lead to stress, in the world of work as well as in private life.

Social networks and messengers such as WhatsApp, Facebook and Co. can quickly overwhelm users with the flood of information. The pressure to constantly interact socially can be stressful. In a study for his dissertation, he denied 130 users access to Facebook for two weeks. Before and during the study, the participants completed questionnaires about their state of mind and usage behavior. And physical stress indicators such as sweating were monitored using the skin conductance. For the private sector, the scientist came to the conclusion that technostress can arise on the one hand through overuse and on the other hand through the withdrawal of Facebook.

According to Maier, technostress manifests itself in the work environment through an increase in burnout illnesses. If something changes in a company when using IT, this can lead to stress and illness. Especially when there is a lack of understanding of how to operate the new IT.

2018 delivered a German

Study by the University of Augsburg

under the direction of industrial engineer Henner Gimpel, a similar result: Excessive digital stress reduces work performance and can have health consequences. The workers then often suffer from back pain, headaches and general fatigue. The flood of digital technologies and a lack of skills in dealing with IT are also cited as stress triggers.

What eye surgery has to do with it

However, it does not always have to result in digitization as a stress factor. The eye surgeon Mithu Storoni takes a slightly different approach. In 2017 she published her book «Stress Proof» («Stress-resistant»). «Stress does not start in the body, it starts in the brain», is her finding from the countless scientific publications that she researched for her book. In one

Essay for the broadcaster «BBC»

the author explained why stress and anxiety play an increasingly important role today:

Modern eye surgeons sometimes suffer from what is known as central serous retinopathy. Fluid accumulates under the retina and the resulting swellings can lead to impaired vision. This phenomenon is often triggered by stress. Military personnel already suffered from it in World War II. If the stress is reduced, the symptoms decrease. The surgeons have come to the conclusion that the new surgical technologies have meanwhile broken the physical limits of a surgeon. The focus is no longer on the physical performance of the hands, but on the mental performance of analysis and concentration. Constantly working to the limit creates enormous emotional pressure — stress.

According to recent studies, chronic stress is suspected to play a role in high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, as the author writes. For Mithu Storoni, social status and urbanization are two other stress factors. Social interactions and maintaining status can cause brooding and mental stress. Urban life with its constant sources of light also has little calming effect on our brain, especially not the infamous

blue light.

It is supposed to suppress the secretion of the sleep hormone melatonin. And according to Storoni, even ready meals have an impact on our stress behavior. Studies would link highly processed foods to symptoms of depression. Our eating habits would change the microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, and those microorganisms would in turn — through interaction with immune cells and in other ways — affect how our brains respond to stress.

The author comes to the conclusion that psychological pressure is a limiting factor in an age in which physical stress is increasingly being transformed into a mental one.

Read news for free for 1 month now! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

NEWS FROM THE NETWORK

Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at)

New access (yachtrevue.at)

8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at)

Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto.at)

In the new trend: Shock-Down — how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

»

Is our life really more stressful than it used to be? Yes, say some experts. And they explain what is causing us so much stress these days.

Stress is essential for survival. If an opponent attacks us, stress hormones are released. The pulse accelerates, the blood pressure rises, for a short time the body is in an alarm state, it is more efficient. Once the stressful situation is over, the body switches back to normal and recovers. Without this relaxation, however, stress can become chronic and harm us.

Fits to:

10 tips on how to get rid of stress easily

Young and already exhausted

A stress study by the insurance company Allianz in 2017 showed that 39 percent of all Austrians feel significantly impaired by stress at work, 25 percent by stress in their free time. It is also interesting: It is not mainly older people who complain about too much stress, but the young: That

Market research institute «Market»

asked in 2018 how severely stressed Austrians feel. 58 percent stated that they felt moderately to severely stressed, including above all the age categories of 16 to 49 year olds and the group of employed people (compared to the non-employed).

STRESS STRESS

Infogram

Job stress factor

According to the Chamber of Labor (AK), the following factors play an important role in occupational stress: a high amount of work and too little time, unclear information and work interruptions. Professional recognition and social support (e.g. from colleagues) are also important. In 2012, the AK commissioned a study from the Austrian Institute for Economic Research (WIFO) and Danube University Krems, which put the cost of mental illness in 2009 at 3.3 billion euros.